NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula Expanding

It’s the bubble versus the cloud. NGC 7635, the Bubble Nebula, is being pushed out by the stellar wind of massive star BD+602522, visible in blue toward the right, inside the nebula.

NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula Expanding

Next door, though, lives a giant molecular cloud, visible to the far right in red. At this place in space, an irresistible force meets an immovable object in an interesting way.

The cloud is able to contain the expansion of the bubble gas, but gets blasted by the hot radiation from the bubble’s central star. The radiation heats up dense regions of the molecular cloud causing it to glow.

The Bubble Nebula, pictured here is about 10 light-years across and part of a much larger complex of stars and shells. The Bubble Nebula can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Queen of Aethiopia (Cassiopeia).

Image Credit: Göran Nilsson & The Liverpool Telescope

Stardust In Constellation Aries

This composition in stardust covers over 8 degrees on the northern sky. The mosaicked field of view is west of the familiar Pleiades star cluster, toward the zodiacal constellation Aries and the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy.

Stardust In Constellation Aries

At right in the deep skyscape is bluish Epsilon Arietis, a star visible to the naked-eye and about 330 light-years away.

Reflecting starlight in the region, dusty nebulae LBN762, LBN753, and LBN743 sprawl left to right across the field, but are likely some 1,000 light-years away.

At that estimated distance, the cosmic canvas is over 140 light-years across. Near the edge of a large molecular cloud, their dark interiors can hide newly formed stars and young stellar objects or protostars from prying optical telescopes.

Collapsing due to self-gravity, the protostars form around dense cores embedded in the molecular cloud.

Image Credit & Copyright: Rogelio Bernal Andreo (Deep Sky Colors)

Spiral Galaxy NGC 1055 Close-up

 

This spiral galaxy named NGC 1055 is a dominant member of a small galaxy group a mere 60 million light-years away toward the constellation Cetus.

Spiral Galaxy NGC 1055

Seen edge-on, the island universe spans over 100,000 light-years, a little larger than our own Milky Way. The colorful stars in this cosmic close-up of NGC 1055 are in the foreground, well within the Milky Way.

The telltale pinkish star forming regions are scattered through winding dust lanes along the distant galaxy’s thin disk. With a smattering of even more distant background galaxies, the deep image also reveals a boxy halo that extends far above and below the central bluge and disk of NGC 1055.

The halo itself is laced with faint, narrow structures, and could represent the mixed and spread out debris from a satellite galaxy disrupted by the larger spiral some 10 billion years ago.

Image Credit & Copyright: Processing – Robert Gendler, Roberto Colombari
Data – European Southern Observatory, Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), et al.